What Passport Line Was the Mummy In?

When the mummy of Ramesses II was transported to special laboratories in France in 1974 to assist in preserving its condition, a passport was required.  Under French law, anyone who enters the country, alive or dead, must hold a passport. So the Egyptian government issued a passport to King Ramesses II, labeling him as “King (deceased)”.   Just as interestingly, when the mummy arrived in France, it was received with a funeral procession of full military honors, as was fitting for all members of high rank.

Will Rogers

“Everybody says somebody ought to do something; this time it looks like it might be us.”

The Mummy Returned

Ramesses II, was the 3rd Pharoah of Egypt and lived to be 96 years old.  He ascended to the throne in 1290 BCE and after his death, this great King was mummified, as was the Egyptian custom.   In 1974, the mummy’s condition was getting significantly worse and the Egyptian government agreed to let France take the mummy back to its laboratories for treatment.  What official documents were needed in order to transport the  mummy of Ramesses II to France?

 

3 Musketeers – 3 Flavors

When the 3 Musketeers bar was originally made, it was split into three pieces – 3 colors and 3 flavors: vanilla, chocolate and strawberry. During World War II, vanilla and strawberry became increasingly more expensive and difficult to obtain in large quantities, so the Mars company opted to go with all chocolate. . . which it has remained since.

Steve Jobs

“Great things in business are never done by one person. They’re done by a team of people.”

3 Flavors: Athos, Porthos, Aramis

Originally, a 3 Musketeers bar had three pieces, each with a different color and a different flavor. What were they and why is it only chocolate flavored now?

Pugilism

Boxing is the only sport in which neither participants nor spectators know who is winning or what the score is until the match is over.

Albert Einstein

“Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.”

Total Eclipse of the . . .

You may have started humming the Bonnie Tyler song, but it’s not our hearts that will be eclipsed . . at least not today.  Instead, today, Monday, August 21, 2017,  the moon will pass in front of the Sun, displaying a total solar eclipse to millions and a partial solar eclipse to many more millions.  A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon’s apparent diameter is larger than the sun’s, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness.

While the rest of the United States and many other parts of the world will experience a partial solar eclipse, a total solar eclipse will be visible to viewers within a 70 mile wide swath crossing parts of fourteen states of the continental United States: Starting in Oregon, continuing through Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, and finally South Carolina before heading out over the Atlantic Ocean. That’s about 12 million US residents and another 10 million estimated tourists flocking in to witness the event!

If you want to know when the eclipse will start, peak and end near you, Vox Media has an Interactive Web Page that allows you to put in your  Zip Code and see the start, peak and end times, as well as the percentage of totality that will be visible in your area. You can also turn your smartphone or tablet into a guide for the event, using Android or iOS apps such as Eclipse Safari or Clear Outside.

Enjoy the rare and magnificent astronomical event and remember – safety first – don’t look directly at the sun.  Even if you are using “approved” glasses (Certified as ISO 12312-2 compliant) make sure they are from a legitimate vendor and they are actually legitimate.  As a test, put the glasses on and look at your brightest bulb or any really bright light — you shouldn’t be able to see ANYTHING (as in zero, nada, zilch, nothing!)  A safe solar glass filter will give you a view of the sun (and ONLY the sun) that will look like a full moon, surrounded by dark sky and it will also block UV and IR radiation.  If you look up and find the sun uncomfortable to look at, out of focus or with a haze around it, don’t use them (or if they are scratched or appear damaged in any way). According to the American Astronomical Society, those won’t be safe.

For you trivia buffs, the last time a total solar eclipse was visible crossing the entire continental U.S. was on June 8, 1918, and the next time a total solar eclipses will cross the U.S. (12 States) will be in April of 2024 and another total solar eclipse will cross 10 States of the continental United States again in August 2045.

What’s the Score?

What is the only sport in which neither the participants, nor the spectators know the score or even who is winning until after the contest is over?